Collection


The museum has a large collection of historic equipment from Maine’s narrow gauge railways. Below is a listing of locomotives, passenger coaches, combines, cabooses, box cars and other miscellaneous equipment in the museum’s collection.

Steam Locomotives:

Monson Railroad Steam Locomotive #3

  • Built: 1913
  • Builder: Vulcan Iron Works, Wilkes-Barre, PA
  • About: Monson #3 ran from Monson Junction to Monson until the railroad’s demise in 1943. Locomotive #3 is on loan to the Sandy River Railroad Museum until 2023, though she often returns to the museum in the autumn and winter season and can be seen in operation for our annual Polar Express event.

 Monson Railroad Steam Locomotive #4

  • Built: 1918  
  • Builder: Vulcan Iron Works, Wilkes-Barre, PA
  • About: Monson #4 is very similar to #3 and was the last locomotive built for the Monson Railroad. Locomotive #4 was taken out of service in the spring of 2015 and is on display in our museum.

Bridgton & Saco River Steam Locomotive #7

  • Built: 1913
  • Builder: Baldwin Locomotive Works, Philadelphia, PA
  • About: 7 and #8 were the last engines to operate on the Bridgton and Harrison Railroad, the successor to the Bridgton and Saco River. Engine #7 is undergoing restoration. We hope to have it back in service by late 2017.

Bridgton & Saco River Steam Locomotive #8

  • Built: 1924
  • Builder: Baldwin Locomotive Works, Philadelphia, PA
  • About: Bridgton & Saco River #8 was the last and largest locomotive built for the Bridgton and Saco River Railroad. She is currently out of service and stored in our engine house.

Passenger Coaches:

Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes Coach #9

  • Built: 1901     
  • Builder: Jackson and Sharp, Wilmington, DE
  • About: The “Rangeley” was the only two-foot “parlor” car ever built in the United States and was used only in the summer. Passengers paid an extra fee to ride from Farmington to the Rangeley Lakes House, a posh hotel with its own station. The car featured plush swivel seats, a smoking section, a restroom, and other amenities. The car is on display in the museum.

Bridgton & Saco River Coaches #15 & #16

  • Built: 1882
  • Builder: Billmeyer and Small, York, PA
  • About: Coaches #15, known as the Pondicherry, and #16, known as the Mount Pleasant, are almost twins. The Pondicherry is in service on the train and the Mount Pleasant is on display in the museum.

Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes Coach #19

  • Built: 1890
  • Builder: Billmeyer and Small, York, PA
  • About: Originally built as #2 for the Phillips & Rangeley Railroad, the coach is in storage awaiting restoration.

Combines

Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes Combine #14

  • Built: 1903
  • Builder: Jackson and Sharp, Wilmington, DE
  • About: Originally built as #3 for the Franklin and Megantic Railroad, the car is on display in the museum.

 Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes Combine #15

  • Built: 1890
  • Builder: Billmeyer and Small, York, PA
  • About: Originally built as #2 for the Phillips and Rangeley Railroad, the car is now in service on our train.

Cabooses:

Bridgton & Saco River Caboose #32/101

  • Built: 1882
  • Builder: Laconia Car Company, Laconia, NY
  • About: Originally caboose #32, the car was renumbered to #101 in 1892. The cupola was destroyed and never replaced after allegedly hitting a low-hanging guy wire. Many years later the caboose was restored by our museum volunteers and the cupola was returned. Caboose #32 is on display in the museum.

Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes Caboose #12/553

  • Built: 1904
  • Builder: Sandy River Railroad
  • About: The longest Sandy River caboose was built as caboose #12 from the remains of Phillips & Rangeley coach #3 which had been destroyed in a fire. It was renumbered to 553 after the formation of the Sandy River and Rangeley Lakes railroad. The caboose is in service on our train.

 Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes Caboose #557

  • Built: 1913
  • Builder: Maine Central Railroad, Waterville, ME
  • About: Caboose #557 is one of three end-cupola cabooses built in 1913 for The Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes Railroad. The caboose is currently undergoing restoration by our museum volunteers.

Box Cars

Bridgton and Saco River Railroad Box Cars #50, #52, #56, #57, #60, #62, #70

  • Built: 1889-1905
  • Builder: Portland Company, Portland, ME and Bridgton and Saco River Railroad
  • About: In 1922 the Bridgton and Saco River Railroad had 22 boxcars. In 1940 several of the cars were salvaged to raise money for the line. Most of the cars were damaged due to vandalism, the weather, and pilferage while they were stored at Bridgton Junction and Bridgton after the line closed in 1941. The boxcars in our collection are currently stored on the museum property.

 Bridgton and Saco River Railroad Flanger #40

  • Built: 1913
  • Builder: Maine Central Railroad, Portland, ME
  • About: The flanger was built using an 1882 stake-bodied flat car built by Laconia Car Company and was given the flat car’s original number. A flanger would follow a snow plow and clear the area between the rails, scraping the top of the track, and using a spreader to widen the right of way. The flanger is presently stored at our Gray location.

Miscellaneous Items

Bridgton and Saco River Railroad Snow Plow #2

  • Built: 1900
  • Builder: Bridgton and Saco River Railroad
  • About: This wedge plow has a wood-beamed frame and a steel blade. Wedge plows pushed snow to both sides of the right-of-way and were used on single-line tracks. All of Maine’s narrow gauge lines were single track and used only wedge plows for snow removal. The snow plow is stored on the museum property awaiting restoration.

Bridgton and Saco River Tank

  • Built: 1903
  • Builder: Portland Company, Portland, ME 
  • About: In the early 1900s Standard Oil shipped oil to Bridgton via the Bridgton and Saco River Railroad which had Maine’s only two-foot gauge tank cars. The oil from one standard gauge car would fill two narrow gauge cars. The railroad built a storage tank on its property, and oil was delivered locally using a 700-gallon horse-drawn tank. The tank is stored on the museum property in Gray.

Sandy River and Rangeley Lakes Inspection Car

  • Built: 1925
  • Builder: Sandy River and Rangeley Lakes Railroad, Phillips, ME
  • About: Built with parts from two earlier Model T Ford track cars, the car was primarily as an inspection car by Superintendent Orin Vose. It was commonly known as the “Vose inspection car”. The car is on display in the museum, and is occasionally used for special events.

Sandy River and Rangeley Lakes Rail Bus #4 / Bridgton and Harrison Rail Bus #3

  • Built: 1925
  • Builder: Sandy River and Rangeley Lakes Railroad, Phillips, ME
  • About: The Sandy River and Rangeley Lakes Railroad began building rail cars to use in place of steam powered trains as passenger service on the line declined. Rail Bus #4, the last remaining rail bus in existence, was built with an REO truck frame and motor. In 1936, after the railroad had closed, the bus was purchased by Edgar Mead and leased to the Bridgton and Harrison Railroad for $1 a year. There it was renumbered #3. The bus is presently on loan to Boothbay Railway Village.

Reproduction Cars:

Combine #12

  • Built: 1958
  • Builder: Edaville Railroad, South Carver, MA
  • About: This combination car was modeled on a Billmeyer & Small car built in the 1880s for the Phillips and Rangeley Railroad. The car is in service on our train.

Passenger Coaches #22, #23, #24, #25

  • Built: 1958 – 1987    
  • Builder: Edaville Railroad, South Carver, MA
  • About: These reproduction coaches were built to provide more passenger seating on the popular Edaville Railroad. They were based on coaches built by the Phillips and Rangeley Railroad. Coaches #22, #24, and #25 are in use on our train.

Passenger Coaches #54 and #55

  • Built: 1950s
  • Builder: Edaville Railroad, South Carver, MA
  • About: Edaville originally used old boxcars to build open excursion cars. In 1955 the cars were converted to these closed coaches.

Open Cars #102 and #105

  • Built: 1960s
  • Builder: Edaville Railroad, South Carver, MA
  • About: Edaville built these covered open coaches to help fill their need for more passenger cars. They were built using parts from flat and box car bodies from the Bridgton and Harrison Railroad.  #102 and #105 are used on our train during the warm weather.